DJENIE: A FOLLOW UP & A SURPRISE DIESEL DELIVERY AND BACK TO THE SAME OLD SAME OLD

Posted: February 25, 2010 in Uncategorized
Djenie is like a teenager anywhere.  Up one minute down the next.  She
is dramatic for attention and loves it when we are moms to her.  This
is a universal story except that Djenie is a mom herself and lives in
total poverty in Cite Soley.  Our medical transport field bus picks her
up or she comes on her own to our hospital each day and then we take
her to the Miami Field Hospital to see her baby Kenley.  He is now four
pounds and we breathe a sigh of relief each day when we find him
breathing in his tiny suitcase/incubator.  When we bring her to see him
she coos, makes faces at him, cries until we let her hold him and
remarks on his every facial expression.  It is pure love.
Today we were traveling into Cite Soley to make a home visit, meet
Djenie’s family and check out where Kenley will eventually be going
home to.  I know Haiti, I knew it would be poor, crowded, gray, sad and
stifling.  It was.  We couldn’t find Djenie although we knew who her
family was on sight – they mirrored her features.  Mom told me Djenie
is one of eight children.  I asked to see where she slept.  I wish I
hadn’t.  A room with tin walls held a bed, one pillow, some sort of
shelf with a broken doll and that was it.  Mom said 9 people slept in
that room.  It was dark, the alley was dark and no one should have to
live there.  But they do – by the thousands.
We left thinking that Djenie had missed us and would find her own way
to the Heartline Hospital.  As we made our way back to our oversized
white truck she came running and yelling.  I ran toward her, Laura ran
toward her and we had a reunion of hugs.  Overkill to be sure but I am
on a mission to make this kid feel special and keep her coming back.
 All seemed well.  I rode on top of the truck back to Clercine and
Djenie and midwife Laura rode in the cage.  I love the top of the truck
with its view of the city.  It’s worth the near decapitation from wires
to enjoy the breeze and the view.  Port-au-Prince never stops amazing
me with its crowds, traffic jams, trash, broken buildings and color.
When we got back to the hospital Laura realized Djenie was sick.  She
had a high fever and her mastitis (breast infection)  had gotten bad
again.  Without the baby to nurse she is more prone to this.  We got
Doctor Jen to look at her who put her on an IV, on meds and put her to
bed.  Djenie was crushed that she couldn’t go see the baby today.  When
I left she was sleeping, emotions spent.
There are thousands of Djenies and Kenleys in the slums of
Port-au-Prince.  Somehow God brought us these two and we will invest in
their lives.  This premature baby and his teen mom both lie in a
hospital tonight.  Both fighting to get better and go home to a place
most of us wouldn’t want to spend an hour in.  Somehow we have claimed
each other and Kenley and Djenie matter to us.  Ownership.  Somehow God
brought us together and we will do all we can for the two of them.
 Djenie will enter our women’s program and learn parenting skills and
how to make better choices.   She will find support and love.  And love
changes people no matter where they live.


NINE PEOPLE SLEEP IN THIS ONE ROOM ON THIS ONE MATTRESS



 TIN SHACK HOUSES ONE OF WHICH IS WHERE DJENIE AND HER FAMILY LIVE


DJENIE SLEEPING AT THE HEARTLINE FIELD HOSPITAL WITH AN IV ATTACHED TO HER

A SURPRISE DIESEL DELIVERY

Yesterday afternoon Heartline got a great gift of free diesel for our
generators and patient transport truck.  Ted Honcharik, chairman of the
Fuel Relief Fund, has a California based charity which responds to
disasters and makes sure that emergency generators and vehicles have
sufficient fuel to operate.  The Fuel Relief Fund was active after
Hurricane Katrina and shortly after the Port au Prince earthquake, Ted
jumped on a plane to Haiti.  With the help of local industry contacts,
Ted quickly found a donated oil truck and knowledgeable staff.  He has
spent the last few weeks driving from clinic to camp, delivering much
needed fuel.  As there is still no centrally delivered electricity,
emergency generators are literally saving lives.  We hope to be
added to their weekly route.  Many thanks to Ted and Fuel Relief Fund!

We have not had city electricity
since January 12th, the day of the earthquake.  We are running our
diesel generator at the field hospital for most of the day and we are
burning through the diesel, so what a blessing it was to receive free
diesel from FUEL RELIEF FUND.

YOUR GENEROUS DONATION HELPS US HELP OTHERS.  PLEASE CLICK HERE TO DONATE TO HELP HEARTLINE HELP OTHERS

UPDATE:
THE HAITIAN GOVERNMENT IS GETTING BACK TO NORMAL AS IT IS HOLDING IN CUSTOMS HUMANITARIAN SUPPLIES MEANT TO HELP THE PEOPLE.  WE AND MANY OTHER ORGANIZATIONS HAVE MEDICINES AND SUPPLIES BEING HELD WHICH WON’T BE RELEASED UNLESS WE PAY AN EXORBITANT TAX.  THE ONLY SURPRISE IS THAT IT TOOK SIX WEEKS TO HAPPEN.
READ ABOUT IT HERE



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Comments
  1. Chris says:

    Thank God for you, for touching the lives of people like Djenie and her baby! Thank God for the Fuel Relief Fund folks! Everything else is heartbreaking, the tin shack, the terrible news about the new Haitian government rules. It is wreaking havoc and is absolutely WRONG. We\’re going to pray against it. May the protest be so loud, and world opinion so appalled, that the Haitian government withdraws this horrific notion of holding hostage relief supplies in exchange for money. May God, who has blessed relief workers like you many times over, who has touched thousands of people through you and your fellows, intervene here. No obstacle is too great for God to overcome. Chris and Joe in California

  2. John says:

    AMEN! AMEN! AMEN!

  3. Lucas says:

    Thanks for the updates! Glad you are there doing God\’s work and I hope to bring you a whoppa soon 🙂

  4. John says:

    A triple whopper!

  5. Nancy says:

    Thanks for the update on Djenie and Kenley, they have been on my heart since you first wrote about them. Bless you all for being the hands and feet of Jesus!

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